Homelessness

The number of rough sleepers in the City of Wolverhampton has decreased in the city recently, thanks to the partnership between Hope into Action, Good Shepherd Ministries, Wolverhampton Homes, Recovery Near You, SUIT, St George’s Hub, the Refugee Migrant Centre and the P3 charity. On a recent visit to Wolverhampton, Jon Kuhrt (Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government) reminded partnership members that ‘no-one gets off the streets by the work of just one agency.’ Through the economy of ‘together,’ the homelessness charities are aiming to ‘make homelessness history’ in Wolverhampton.


Poverty

Cassius FrancisBlack Country people battling debt are to benefit from the appointment of a new worker who will coordinate efforts across the four boroughs to help them become more financially resilient. The Revd Cassius Francis has joined Transforming Communities Together as its ‘Just Finance Black County Development Worker.’ The Black County is the fourth area in the country to benefit from a dedicated development worker. Contact Cassius at this address

The Black Country Foodbank is a co-operative response to the increasing levels of food poverty across the Black Country. The Foodbank enjoys support from many churches, as well as businesses, clubs and individuals. There are 20 collection centres across the four boroughs and a storage/distribution point in Brierley Hill. More information via this link


Modern slavery

Tragically, modern slavery and human trafficking are very much present in the Black Country, as in every part of the country. Thankfully Christian groups are responding to the need by supporting people rescued from slavery and by working with the authorities to raise awareness of the issue. These groups include the Adavu Project, My Gateway to Freedom, The Medaille Trust and PITS-STOP


Dementia

Su Parker is the Dementia-Friendly Enabler for the Black Country part of the Church-of-England Diocese of Lichfield. In her role, Joy will aim to:

  • Deliver ‘Dementia-Friendly Church’ courses in four sessions, covering pastoral care, church services, church buildings and community networks

  • Deliver services in individual churches to raise awareness among the whole congregation, using the national ‘Dementia Friends’ initiative

  • Offer advice and support when requested.

More information from Su via this link. 


Places of Welcome

Places of Welcome is a growing network of local community groups providing their neighbourhoods with places where all people feel safe to belong, connect and contribute. A Place of Welcome offers your neighbourhood a place where everyone can go for a friendly face, a cup of tea and a conversation if and when they need it.

Places of Welcome

Each Place of Welcome offers:

+ PLACE – An accessible and hospitable building, open at the same time every week

+ PEOPLE – Open to everyone, regardless of their circumstances or situation, and staffed by volunteers

+ PRESENCE – A place where people actively listen to one another 

+ PROVISION – Offering free refreshment (e.g. a cup of tea and a biscuit) and basic local information

+ PARTICIPATION – Every person will bring talents, experiences and skills that they may be willing to share locally 

Places of Welcome operate in church buildings and community centres all over the Black Country. Find more information about when and where here